Suzanne – Past Life Proof?

Does Suzanne’s experience offer ‘proof’ of past lives? Here’s what happened when she regressed herself using the Mypastlife recordings…

In her own words…

Suzanne“… I settled down, switched on the CD and straight away Andrew’s soothing voice put me at ease – it felt exactly the same as if I was in his room with him.

The first image that came to mind was of a Norseman, just the face in the mask, and then a stag like creature.   Then the name Robert McKechnie came to me, as did the age 37, 1915 and 1917 and Newfoundland.

I was a soldier in World War 1 in the trenches, ankle deep in mud and water.  I saw my boots, the webbing  and green uniform.  However opposite that, confusingly at first, I also saw a beautiful image of a bay set between two large cliffs, a little half moon shaped quayside dotted with houses (here St. John’s came to mind).   I realised that I was indeed in the trenches but was homesick and thinking of home.  (I had a go at painting and sketching what I have seen as I have found from the past that this helps).

suzanneskt 2suzanneskt2 2

I was a man of average height, average build, fair/light brown hair, moustache, blue eyes.  My job was to deliver correspondence and messages between posts.  I slept on the floor of my officer’s room as was regularly needed at short notice for deliveries.  There was so much detail around me both imagery and smell.  The smell… the stench of the mud, injured, dead bodies, fumes – so much so that this stayed with me for the rest of the day after the regression!  My officer was a hard, aggressive, no-nonsense person who had no time for people with other opinions.  His view was basically “you came to do a job so get on with it”.

suzanneimageEventually, every man was needed to go over and I was given a rifle.  I was petrified, panicked and started shooting everywhere.   As I moved forward over the bodies and mud,  I felt extreme pain and a sort of adrenaline burst through my left shoulder – it felt as if it was happening now and part of me panicked thinking “oh my god, I’ve just been shot”.  Then I recalled that it was not this “now” but another “now” and so continued.  I had indeed been shot in the shoulder and as I collapsed to the floor and tried to pull myself towards the trench, a friend tried to help bring me in.

As he rose up to pull me in I saw a bullet tear through his face and he collapsed into my arms and died.   The feeling of guilt I bore was tremendous.

My next memory was of having been sent home to Newfoundland where I suffered shell shock and fits, and because of the limited use of my left arm had to resort to mending nets and baskets on the quayside.  I had become an object of fear and fascination to the local people and felt incredibly lonely and sad.  I felt that I had let everyone down.  I was a failure.  One day I suffered a massive fit wherein I choked and died.  I can still see everyone standing around me, but people were to scared to help.    The year was 1917.

Research:   I was so amazed at the amount of detail I received that I decided to look into a genealogy site to see if any of the information came up (but didn’t expect to find anything – why I don’t know!).

There were many Robert McKechnies, but I soon found one who had signed up in November 1914 aged 37 and discharged following injury in 1916. I can only assume that 1915 is the year I was sent into action.

On further investigation it appeared that Robert had emigrated with his mother and siblings from Scotland to America at the age of 5.  There is also record of a Mr McKechnie’s death in the St John’s area of Newfoundland in 1917 but I do still need to do further research to tie up a few facts and hopefully find a photograph!

I plan to use the advanced regression CD to go back and see if I can uncover anything else that will help me in my search.

The two initial images confused me. I then found out that Newfoundland had been settled by Norsemen, who unlike their more well known counterparts, were a peaceful people who just wished to be farmers or fishermen.  At the time of WW1, Newfoundland was still under the British Empire and so soldiers were called up to fight alongside the British.  The insignia of the Newfoundland regiment was the Caribou.

Emotions:  I have always hated anger, aggression, violence and war. People who are loud and aggressive have, until recently, made me cower and feel physically sick.   Guilt issues have always been a problem for me – I have always felt guilty if something happens to someone else even if it is something out of my control.  I used to feel I had to be responsible for everything and everyone.    I have always worried about letting people down, not living up to their expectations.  Having taken on board everything that happened I am trying to “let go” a little and not feel so responsible for everything and actually, whilst hard to do, it feels good.

Andrew, I can only say “thank you”, yet again.  Your CD has given everyone the chance to discover themselves and understand things from “now” more than they would previously have realised.  The CD is incredible, and as I said at the start, it is just as if I were sitting in your office with you.  I can’t wait to explore further. ..

Suzanne

  Thank you to Suzanne,  for sharing.

If you are interested in finding out who you may have been in your own past lives,  you CAN …